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Vehicle registration plates of Brunant have been used since the 1900s to register vehicles.

Standard platesEdit

License plates brunant

Standard plates

Fiat 500

Fiat with current plates

As the most of plates in countries within the European Union, Brunant's plates have a blue strip on the left showing the country code in white text and the Flag of Europe.

Plates have used a two-letter, four number combination since 1965 (such as BD 1980), and still use the same font. The current EU-style design dates to 1999. Numbers which are retired are reissued again for new vehicles. The current alphanumeric combination on plates allows for 6.759.324 different plate characters.

Official platesEdit

Royal plates

The Queen's plates

Official government plates are issued to the Queen and her family, as well as the Prime minister. These are numbered 1 and 2, respectively and are only used on State cars of Brunant. Other royal vehicles may bear the numbers three to nine.

Diplomatic platesEdit

Diplomatic license plate France

Diplomatic plates (France)

Libertan ambassador dipl license plate

Libertan ambassador's plates

Diplomatic plates feature a yellow color and use a different numbering system (starting with CD for Ddiplomatic corps, one to three digits for the country and two digits to identify the car. The current diplomatic plate system has been in use since 1990. The country codes presently used are:

  • 1 Portugal
  • 2 Holy See
  • 3 Spain
  • 4 Italy
  • 5 Germany
  • 6 Traspes
  • 7 United Kingdom
  • 8 France
  • 9 Denmark
  • 10 Ireland
  • 11 Belgium
  • 12 Netherlands
  • 13 Algeria
  • 14 Lovia
  • 15 Luxembourg
  • 16 Chile
  • 17 European Union
  • 18 Turkey
  • 19 European Union
  • 20 Juliana
  • 21 Czech Republic
  • 22 Australia
  • 23 Morocco
  • 24 Andorra
  • 25 Latvia
  • 26 Lithuania
  • 27 Slovakia
  • 28 Finland
  • 29 Canada
  • 30 United States
  • 31 Austria
  • 32 Prasia
  • 33 Cettatie
  • 34 China
  • 35 Greece
  • 36 Hungary
  • 37 Libertas
  • 38 Russia
  • 39 Sweden
  • 40 Mexico
  • 41 Kuwait
  • 42 Croatia
  • 43 Serbia
  • 44 Slovenia
  • 45 Malta
  • 46 Egypt
  • 47 Mäöres
  • 48 Inselöarna
  • 49 Ghana
  • 50 Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • 51 Lebanon
  • 52 Jordan
  • 53 Japan
  • 54 Argentina
  • 55 Saudi Arabia
  • 56 United Arab Emirates
  • 57 Kemburg
  • 58 Ukraine
  • 59 Lebanon
  • 60 Brazil
  • 61 Bulgaria
  • 62 South Africa
  • 63 Israel
  • 64 Poland
  • 65 Nigeria
  • 66 Pintona
  • 67 Strasland
  • 68 Norway
  • 69 India
  • 70 Iran
  • 71 Romania
  • 72 Switzerland
  • 73 Phaluhm Phoueck
  • 100 United Nations
  • 101 Palestine
  • 102 International Wiki Organisation

Other typesEdit

  • Military: the Royal Guard uses plates with the prefix "M" and four digits (such as M 0156). They feature the Royal Guard emblem instead of the coat of arms.
  • National Police: the police uses plates with the prefix "P" and four digits (such as P 2238). They feature the police logo instead of the coat of arms.
  • Temporary plates: used by automobile and other vehicle dealers for unsold or recently sold vehicles. These are red, are simply printed on the metal and have a validity period of six months. They use a numbering system of two letters, starting with W, 3 digits and then two digits, along with the expiry date (such as WA 125 77 08/12).
  • Motorcycle: these are almost square and feature a two letter, three digit combination (such as GT 260).
  • Bus: These feature a two-letter, five-digit combination, in use since 1953 (such as AS 12296). Unlike car or motorcycle plates, retired bus plate numbers are never reissued.

Historical platesEdit

1940s license plate

1949 license plate

1970S LICENSE PLATE

1970s license plate

1980s license plate

1980s plate

The first license plates appeared in 1900, all back with white text. These featured numbers only, issued in the order of registration. They were use until 1922, when alphanumeric plates first appeared (such as 415 - A).

 122 

License plate from 1918

 259 - A 

License plate from the 1920s

A two-letter, three number plate system was introduced in 1946. These plates were small like the previous ones, though featured a small lion symbol. The current two letter, four digit system was introduced in 1965, on long rectangular black plates. The colors were inverted in 1981 and used until 1999, when European-sized plates with a blue band, country code and 12 stars were introduced. These historic plates are still usable on the original historic vehicle.

Classic automobiles may be fitted with 1965-style plates for an added fee.

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